Five Ways To Entertain Your Kids While On The Road..

You are about to pull your hair out, just picture Chris Farley in a moment of frustration driving down the road, because your kids are bored, and driving you crazy those lovable little ones πŸ™‚


Your in the midst of wanting to drop all of them off and drive into the sunset j/k, but lets be honest all of us parents have had this moment I call the Bridge Imbankment courtesy of the late Chris Farley. 

Here is your solution:

#1) Play road game greats, such as: license plate searches for each of the fifty states, types and makes of cars, counting cows, best impersonator of the animals we see, Sing alongs although not my favorite.


#2) Bring Ipads or tablets for everyone, dvd players. Be cautious of screen time and ability to charge, as to much screen time or loss of charge will cause grumpy kiddos.


#3) Create a Travel binder of activities for your kids



livingwellmom.com

#4) Nest Organizing with Sticky Notes (Amazing)

Sticky Note Time Tabs

Here is another one of the 3 tips for organized travel in this series, and it focuses on organized travel with kids.

 

A little bit of planning and preparation goes a long way in making a road trip with children easier, enjoyable and more fun! This is what we used on our recent travels from western NY to northern Maine.

 

Sticky Note Time Tabs

Sticky Note Time Tabs for Organized Travel with Kids – Neat Nest Organizing

 

Here is how it works:

1. Choose an interval of travel time that suits the age and developmental stage of your child(ren). Mine are 8 and 6, so one-hour increments were just right for them.

 

2. Use sticky notes to record the increments and stick them to the center console below the clock.

 

3. Tell the children that when the clock-time matches the sticky note-time, there will be a small surprise.

 

4. When the interval is reached, remove the sticky note and hand out the prize/monotony-breaker.

 

5. Add more intervals as needed. (I could only fit four at a time.)

 

Prizes/Monotony Breakers
 

The prizes I packed included:

*Little craft kits (sticky mosaics are a big hit!)

*Activity books (paper dolls, sticker storybooks)

*Little trinket toy set

*Little coloring kit

*Candy (Gasp! Yes, a few small treats are just fine to enjoy.)

*Book on CD

*iPod with music

*iPod Touch for electronic game time

 

Travel Guess Who? and Bendaroos were fun options, too.


 

Bingo also found its way into the prize bag. I can call out the objects from my seat.


 

Removable sticky page tabs make great travel bingo markers. They stay put & are reusable, too!


 

Tootsie Pop Contest: See how long each person can go without biting off the candy. 

This took about 20+ minutes; it was fun and also kept things quiet for a bit- bonus!

Packed prize bag was stored near me for easy access.

Note: Prizes came from many sources. We bought a few at Dollar General, got some from Grandma specifically for the trip and some were from a stash I had put away a few months ago. (They seemed like new when brought out for the trip!)
 Also, each child was required to pack her own car bag as well. I am not the only source of entertainment for trips. At these ages, my children are primarily responsible for making their own fun, and they really enjoy preparing and packing their own bags, too. 

Inspiration for this idea came from a July 2012 article in Family Fun Magazine. The author used clothespins attached to the visor instead of the sticky notes. The sticky notes worked better for us, and I liked having the exact time increment written on each. It prevented the constant barrage of β€œis-it-time-for-our-next-surprise?” questions. Plus, the sticky notes were easy to store, use and remove.

idea and content from neatnestorganizing.com

#5) Create some surprise Eggs and wraps some gifts from the dollar store for them to open on the car ride.

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Why We Love Writing, And You Should Too…


Writing is an incredible form of expression. It allows you time to gather your thoughts, and organize them onto paper whether its a blog, journal, research paper, quick notes, you name it. There is an incredible power in the art of writing, and the health benefits.

Writing as a stress relief:

1) I have learned to keep a digital journal at my job to record my days events, to protect myself for accountability in my line of work, as well as write out my frustrations to allow me time to reflect on them, before trying to remedy issues that need addressed.

2) Writing down ideas, dreams, and goals helps you to make plans, and take actions to change your life by making your thoughts a visual reminder.

3) When learning new material whether it’s for an academic class, work or self reflection making notes, writing down main points, items that stand out help you to put that content into long term memory. This will help with frustration and organization.

“Stress, trauma, and unexpected life developments β€” such as a cancer diagnosis, a car accident, or a layoff β€” can throw people off stride emotionally and mentally. Writing about thoughts and feelings that arise from a traumatic or stressful life experience β€” called expressive writing β€” may help some people cope with the emotional fallout of such events”. -Health Harvard

“You can use journaling to help you deal with stressors you don’t feel comfortable sharing with others. Stress psychologists have shown that journaling enhances immune function and can alter the course of chronic conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and asthma”. -Pamela M. Peeke, MD, MPH (healthywomen.org)

“A groundbreaking study of writing’s physical effects appeared in the Journal of the American Medical Association (Vol. 281, No. 14) three years ago. In the study, led by Smyth, 107 asthma and rheumatoid arthritis patients wrote for 20 minutes on each of three consecutive days–71 of them about the most stressful event of their lives and the rest about the emotionally neutral subject of their daily plans.

Four months after the writing exercise, 70 patients in the stressful-writing group showed improvement on objective, clinical evaluations compared with 37 of the control patients. In addition, those who wrote about stress improved more, and deteriorated less, than controls for both diseases. “So writing helped patients get better, and also kept them from getting worse,” says Smyth.” -Bridgett Murray (apa.org)

So take a few minutes today and Journal your thoughts, or write down some goals and ideas you have. Happy Writing and Happy health.